Barney’s Bay

Zyx Flux was bugging me again to give her a travel writing assignment, so I sent her off to Barney’s Bay (two regions, really; SLurl to the main region), a Linden Department of Public Works (LDPW) build that I found in the official Linden Parks and Recreation Directory. Its the tourist-centric remnants of a quaint old sea-side fishing village and a beautiful place to visit. Here is Zyx’s report:

The square at Barney’s Bay is a lovely spot and I imagine it is even more beautiful on a sunny day. 

Barney’s Bay, established in the mid- to late-1800s by most accounts, is a very quiet place, perhaps because I visited on a very overcast day, the sky just begging to be allowed to let it’s pent up rain loose below. Seagulls circled overhead waiting to pounce on treats dropped by absent tourists while shop signs squeakily swung in the light ocean breeze. Occasionally a fog horn sounded from the island’s light house, adding to the lonely feeling that permeates the village. The Holiday homes around the perimeter are empty but freshly painted and well-maintained, awaiting the trourist season to begin. I’m sure that on sunny days in warmer weather the shops and square are busier and people head out into the docks for some sailing (in a nice rezzable Linden sailboat) or fishing (7Seas compatible, but bring your own gear and bait).

The beach is small but it is likely festooned with umbrellas and chairs and towels in warmer months.

Surely at its peak Barney’s Bay was a thriving fishing village with a considerable population. Today the main square is bordered by shops for tourists including one for souvenirs, one for flowers, several shops for sweets such as ice cream and cakes, a coffee shop, the Mole & Mole Travel Agency, and the Hog’s Head Tavern, where you can quaff a pint of Sweaty Old Mole and other select lagers.

The sea was calm today, a portent that the heavy weather would soon grow worse. Two different sailboats are available, including one that uses the region winds (and thus actual skill) for movement. The superbly made fishing trawler at the edge of the region is worth a look and should be a good place from which to cast your fishing line.

From the statue’s plaque:
Bernard “The Navibator” McShnott
Captain of the HMS Besott when it ran aground at
Barney’s rock. He was locked in his cabin at the time
after confiscating a sailor’s “periodical” when he
earned his nickname.

A truly excellent Mole-made village bicycle is yours for the taking, just click for a copy. Then rez it from your Inventory — yes, anyone can rez any prims they want here — and take a ride around the village.

The central water well must be purely decorative and a later addition, however, as any well deep enough to draw water on an island such as this would pull up brackish water, at best, and even seawater under the right conditions. Still, it is beautiful and really enhances the quaintness of the village.

Inside the sweet shop you can get a free lollypop with a click, but the other candies are securely locked up. The jars hold a couple dozen varieties including two kinds of gobstoppersBarney’s Squishy Bottoms, and Barney’s Aniseed Mole Balls. Click everywhere in the other shops for some freebies, but be ready for disappointment. Only t-shirts are available in the souvenir shop despite a plethora of wonderful collectables set out on display.

The Mole & Mole Travel Agency is a warm spot on a cold day (fireplace not pictured) and you can can click the nearly two dozen “brochures” for landmarks to other wonderful LDPW builds.

Even in the off season Barney’s Bay is a fun place and I was glad to spend most of the day there today. I don’t keep many landmarks, but I’m certainly saving one for this location. My congratulations to all the Moles and the entire LDPW for another fine build.

# # #

Exterior Pictures: Windlight set to Lost; Water set to [TOR] Impure
The region standard seems to be typical for Mainland, but an occasional fog would fill the docks area for simulated weather.

Interior Pictures: Windlight set to Default Noon

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